Long Term Care Insurance

ROLLOUT!! Here comes the new system, training, awareness, and all the pushback. A carefully thought out plan will have accounted for the concerns of staff that didn’t get what they wanted out of a new system and can push through. A poorly constructed plan, will fall on the sword of the resistance to change. Training on topics such as: computer protocol, document handling (as we say “to shred or not to shred”), standardization, and a failure plan just to name a few.

Following up on one of last week’s posts, the case was laid out that budget cuts can ultimately hurt the public health. An article this week in the Sacramento Bee puts further force behind that assertion. The Department of health and human services annually offers free influenza shots to the poorest children in Sacramento elementary schools. However, due to state budget cuts, the Department had to end the services to the poorest of local children.

Stay on the safe side of the road and the only way to do this is by having a plan for your future healthcare. It is not wrong to take risks in life but you can try this in other areas, not in long term care.

Except these some employers call you for up to a month, after you claim for offered services. Make sure completely, with your current employer or the company you are going to join, about the program and its features.

This is a growing process and change is never easy, but with change comes a renewal. Renewed awareness, responsibility and renewed sense of accomplishment come from all of these changes. Now, test it. Take a look at where you are at, tweak and tune as necessary, and focus on moving forward with the new process.

My husband Sam, baby Mia and i left the hospital and went to my parent’s home – where our two-year-old son Kage and my parents were waiting for us. This was our temporary home – my parents’ house. Our house had burned earlier in the year and Sam, Kage and i had moved in with my parents while we waited on the insurance to settle and get our new house built.

I knew I had to do my grief work and did not shirk it. This work paid off and I was starting to feel better when my brother died eight weeks later. Several months later the twin’s father studied in another car crash. The fourth death in the family shook my sense of safety. What would happen next?

So if you seriously think you will never need LTC and thus have no plans of preparing for your future healthcare needs, you might as well start planning which of your assets should go first. Is it the house, or perhaps, the commercial property and apartment that you rent out? If it’s your entire nest egg, ask your state’s Medicaid program about the asset limit as this could be around ,500 to ,000.